DIRECTED ENERGY PROFESSIONAL SOCIETY


Directed Energy Systems Symposium
25-29 September 2017 Monterey, California





 

Overview

Symposium Contacts

Agenda

Short Courses

PIBM Workshop

Location & Hotel

Registration & Fees

Companions

Security

Local Weather

Call for Papers

Submissions

Exhibits

Catered Event

Hospitality Suites

 

Workshop and Short Courses

The Power in the Bucket Metric Workshop and these short courses are being offered on 25 September 2017 in conjunction with the 2017 Directed Energy Systems Symposium in Monterey, California. Continuing Education Unit (CEU) credits are awarded for completion of the short courses but not the workshop.

The workshop and all of these courses are taught at the Unclassified, Limited Distribution D level: participation is restricted to U.S. citizens who are employees of the U.S. Department of Defense or its contractors.

Complimentary registration for the workshop is available on the Symposium registration page, but registration will also be available on site. Registration for the short courses requires payment of a fee.

See also Course Registration & Fees at the end of this page.


    Morning Courses

  1. Introduction to the DoD Test & Evaluation Process

  2. Laser Deconfliction

  3. Systems Engineering for Directed Energy Systems

    Afternoon Courses

  1. Active Denial Applications

  2. HPM Modeling and Simulation Tools for Test & Evaluation

  3. Modeling & Simulation Verification, Validation & Accreditation

  4. Tools for Transitioning Technology

  5. Wargaming


Morning Workshop  Power In the Bucket Metric

Classification: Unclassified, Limited Distribution D

Instructor: Jack Slater

Duration: One-hour workshop, starts at 1030

CEUs awarded: 0.0

Course Description: Power in the bucket metric (PIBM) is the DoD Standard for measuring and reporting laser system beam quality. This workshop will provide an overview and discussion of the new DOD PIBM beam quality measurement technique, and put it in context with other commonly used methods.

Intended Audience: This one-hour workshop is intended for any member of the DE community wanting an understanding of PIBM. Registration is complimentary for any 2017 Directed Energy Systems Symposium registrant.

Instructor Biography: Dr. Jack Slater joined Schafer Corporation (now Belcan) in 2002 and presently leads the Schafer team providing technical support to the HEL JTO. He is closely connected to JTO’s high power solid state laser programs, including the now completed RELI and JHPSSL development efforts. He contributed to development of HEL testing protocols and has participated in most of the DOD HEL solid state laser tests since 2005. He received his Ph.D. in atomic physics from the University of Colorado and is a DEPS Fellow.


Course 1.  Introduction to the DoD Test & Evaluation Process

Classification: Unclassified, Limited Distribution D

Instructor: Steven Alderete

Duration: Half-day course, starts at 0800

CEUs awarded: 0.35

Course Description: This course discusses the fundamentals of testing DoD systems, with an emphasis on directed energy systems. Topics include:

  • Overview of Defense Acquisition System
  • Where do we start? - Good requirements
  • The role of the Systems Engineering process
  • Test Planning - when and what do we do it?
    • Test Development Strategy
    • Test & Evaluation Master Plan
  • Types of testing/when started/finished
    • Developmental Testing
    • Initial Operational T&E
    • Live Fire T&E
  • Test execution and reporting
  • Directed energy testing issues
    • Instrumentation
    • Safety
    • Training

Intended Audience:

Instructor Biography:


Course 2.  Laser Deconfliction

Classification: Unclassified, Limited Distribution D

Instructors:
    -  LeAnn Brasure, Schafer
    -  Heather Witts, JFCC SPACE/J95

Duration: Half-day course, runs 0800-1200

CEUs awarded: 0.35

Course Description: This course is intended to teach the "Why, Who, What, How and What's New" of Laser Deconfliction (LD) - the process by which assets are protected from accidental illumination by lasers. Predictive Avoidance (PA), protecting space assets and Airspace Deconfliction (AD), protecting air assets, will also be covered in the course. As the AD process is not as mature as the PA process, it will not be covered in as much detail.

PA and AD are critical pieces of the testing process for DoD and NSF laser systems and a knowledgeable and proactive approach by the testing organization can maximize test windows and minimize frustration. The course is also intended to help the laser community work together in this area and provide a consistent source of information on current issues, capabilities developed by other groups, and what's in store for the future. The course has recently been updated to include the Navy's recent development of a hybrid safety system and QRC deployment. The goal of this course is to familiarize the student with the reasons behind PA, the process for working with the Laser Clearing House (LCH) as well as tools and points of contact available to hopefully simplify and clarify the process. In addition, the course will cover efforts in the community to standardize the process and make the safety requirements more in line with current probabilistic risk assessment methodology.

Topics to be covered include:

  • Intro (who, what, where, when, how)
  • Policy - Defining the environment, present and future
  • Implementation - How do we keep assets safe
  • How do we identify risks, to include tools available

Intended Audience: Anyone who is currently involved or anticipates involvement in laser testing will benefit from this course. Test planners and managers as well as those technically involved with the testing are welcome.

Instructor Biographies: Heather Witts is the DE Engineer for the JFCC SPACE/JSpOC. In that role she advises JFCC SPACE and laser programs in carrying out the Laser Clearinghouse mission. She was accepted into the Navy Nuclear Propulsion Officer Candidate (NuPOC) Program in 2001 and graduated from Luther College with a BA in Math and Physics in May 2003. She received her commission in December 2003, completed sea tours on USS IWO JIMA and USS DWIGHT D EISENHOWER, and passed the nuclear engineers exam. In August 2008, then LT Lehmann reported to JFCC SPACE/J95 at Vandenberg AFB as Deputy Chief of the Directed Energy Branch where she spent most of her time dedicated to carrying out the LCH mission. In late 2010 she transitioned out of the active force, into the Navy Reserves, and became an AF civilian - remaining in a similar position at JFCC SPACE. She obtained a Masters Degree in Engineering Management and was married in 2011. Ms. Witts is primarily responsible for deconfliction related policy, new implementation strategies, and deconfliction related technology.

LeAnn Brasure works for Schafer Corporation supporting the HEL JTO as part of their technical team. She graduated from the University of Michigan with a BS in Physics and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Air Force. She obtained her Masters Degree in nuclear physics through the Air Force Institute of Technology and retired from the Air Force after 24 years of active duty service. During her active duty time she had assignments including WSMC (Vandenberg AFB), AFTAC (Patrick AFB) as well as a physics instructor at the Air Force Academy. She began to focus on solid state lasers during her assignment as an AFRL Laboratory Representative at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Her last assignment was with AFRL at Kirtland AFB as the Solid State Laser Branch Chief. Her role as a part of the HEL JTO team is to monitor current technology projects and help define new technology development programs such as the JTO's Predictive Avoidance and Airspace Deconfliction effort. In addition, she has recently begun work on inernational agreements, helping the JTO craft multi-service "purple" agreements to facilitate international collaboration.


Course 3.  Systems Engineering for Directed Energy Systems

Classification: Unclassified, Limited Distribution D

Instructor: Bill Decker, Defense Acquisition University

Duration: Half-day course, runs 0800-1200

CEUs awarded: 0.35

Course Description: This course is designed to provide a better understanding the DoD Systems Engineering Process and align DE programs to it, to increase their likelihood of fielding to the Warfighter. At the end of the course, attendees will be better able to direct their programs such that they are consistent with the DoD SE processes and can integrate smoothly with existing and future DoD weapons systems. The course will cover the DoD Systems Engineering Process throughout the Lifecycle.

Topics include:

  • SE and Requirements/User Interaction
  • Systems Architecture and its application to DE Systems
  • Systems Engineering in the Technology Demonstration Phase
    • Government Role (S&T and Acquisition Staffs)
    • Contractor Role
    • For Systems and Sub-systems
  • SE at the Preliminary Design Review/Milestone B
  • SE at the Critical Design Review
  • Testing and SE
  • Sustainment and SE

Intended Audience: Program managers and engineers involved in the development of directed energy technology and/or directed energy systems. No specific technical expertise is required as a pre-requisite, just a general understanding of DE systems.

Instructor Biography: Mr. Decker is currently the Director, Technology Transition Learning Center of Excellence, Defense Acquisition University and concurrently is a Professor of Engineering Management. His experience includes over 35 years in electro-optics with ten years experience in high energy laser systems, including THEL, ABL, ATL, HELLADS and HELTD, all while employed by Brashear (a division of L-3 Communications) in Pittsburgh, PA. Mr. Decker holds a MS in Physics from the Naval Postgraduate School and a BS in Engineering from Cornell University. He currently consults for Heraeus Quartzglass America in addition to his DAU efforts.


Course 4.  Active Denial Applications

Classification: Unclassified, Limited Distribution D

Instructor: David B. Law, U.S. Marine Corps

Duration: Half-day course, runs 1300-1700

CEUs awarded: 0.35

Course Description: One of the first overarching tutorials available on the bioeffects, hardware, and employment concepts behind a very proven Directed Energy capability that is on the verge of transition out of the research arena. Upon completion, the student should understand: 1) the bioeffects of the Active Denial weapon capability 95 GHz non-lethal directed energy beam and the AFRL scientific research that verifies the safety and effectiveness of the beam, 2) the technology that produces the effect, including hardware, software, beam profile, and relationships such as spot size and range which ultimately drive the scaling potential, 3) how the Active Denial capability may be employed by military force (in both ground and airborne configurations), the military utility, and legalities associated with employment.

Topics include:

  • Bioeffects (history, specific research studies and results, safety thresholds, prohibitions)
  • Technology (history, basic hardware/software, beam geometry and profile, future technical requirements)
  • Operational Use (proven military utility, useful characteristics, and mission enhancements; limitations; countermeasures; policy and legal application)

Intended Audience: Both Government (civilian and military) and industry: project managers, operational testers, and scientific/technical. Technical/scientific education not required, but desirable. Moderate experience level assumed.

Instructor Biography: Mr. David B. Law, USMC, currently serves as the Technology Division Chief for the Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Directorate (JNLWD) and is responsible for: (1) the cost, schedule, and project performance of ~ 50+ JNLWD annual projects; (2) technical and financial program monitoring, execution, and oversight of 50+ JNLWD Science and Technology projects/budgets per year; (3) supervision, mentoring and technical oversight of 10+ officers of primary responsibility and technical monitors of these 50+ projects; and (4) on a weekly basis provide both written and oral technical assessments, evaluations, and recommendations on project “health” of these programs and the “sate” of technology development of all the programs managed by the JNLWD to the JNLWD Deputy Director, the JNLWD Director, the JNLWP Joint Coordination Integration Group (JCIG O-6’s), and the JNLWP Integration Product Team (SESs and O-7’s). Duties also include performing technical and programmatic oversight of the joint development of the DoD’s next-generation non-lethal weapons in support of the escalation of force in traditional and irregular warfare missions and the supervision of the JNLWD technical team of scientists and engineers as well as over 200+ Service-lab Program Managers and Principal Investigators.


Course 5.  HPM Modeling and Simulation Tools for Test & Evaluation: Test Hazard Prediction and Target Surrogate Materials

Classification: Unclassified, Limited Distribution D

Instructor:

Day/Time: Half-day course, runs 1300-1700

CEUs awarded: 0.35

Course Description: The Directed Energy Test & Evaluation Capability (DETEC) has developed two software tools to facilitate High Power Microwave (HPM) testing: HPM Test Hazard Prediction (THP) Tool and the HPM Target Surrogate Material (TSM) database. This short course presents an introduction to both. Drawing from propagation codes such as RF-PROTEC and the EMPIRE Suite, THP provides the T&E community with critical tools and information to mitigate safety and hazard risks to personnel and electronics during open-air tests of HPM systems. THP’s essential functions include:

  1. Support safety and regulatory compliance by calculating and displaying hazard boundaries
  2. Prepare frequency clearance applications in Standard Frequency Action Format (SFAF)
  3. Aid in identifying potential harmful effects to non-test site electronics
  4. Display specific locations or boundaries with specified field levels
In this portion of the short course, students will see the code in action while instructors discuss: Modeling the Physical Scene, Specifying Scenario Input Parameters, Understanding & Selecting Propagation Models, Graphical Visualization and Output Products, Hazard Thresholds and Hazard Zones, Standard Frequency Action Format, Basic Weather and Atmosphere Models, transferring environmental data to THP, Loading and Using HPM Electric Field Sensor Data in THP. The TSM database is a browser based repository of information on hazardous materials as well as surrogates that can be substituted for these hazardous materials during HPM testing. The purpose of the tool is to provide the HPM T&E community with access to a database that contains information on hazardous materials, how to handle those materials during test, and commonly available materials that can be substituted for the hazardous materials. The TSM database’s essential functions are to:
  1. Access to the electromagnetic properties of hazardous materials
  2. Suggestions for safe substitutes for those materials, to include electromagnetic properties
  3. Test Range unique restrictions on hazardous materials
  4. Hazardous material handling instructions, including cleanup procedures
In this portion of the short course, students will see TSM in action while instructors discuss: Finding the electromagnetic properties of a hazardous material; Finding a surrogate for the hazardous material; Making plots of material properties as a function of temperature and frequency; Entering new materials into the database; Extracting the original sources of the electromagnetic data

Intended Audience: The intended users of these HPM tools are test planners, spectrum managers, range safety personnel, test technicians or engineers, and environmental personnel involved in HPM testing.

Instructor Biography:


Course 6.  Modeling and Simulation Verification, Validation and Accreditation

Classification: Unclassified, Limited Distribution D

Instructor:

Day/Time: Half-day course, runs 1300-1700

CEUs awarded: 0.35

Course Description:

Intended Audience:

Instructor Biography:


Course 7.  Tools for Transitioning Technology

Classification: Unclassified, Limited Distribution D

Instructor: Bill Decker, Defense Acquisition University

Duration: Half-day course, runs 1300-1700

CEUs awarded: 0.35

Course Description: The alternative routes for transitioning technology to a program of record will be presented and discussed thoroughly. There are two ways to transition technology, in a routine way, or in an extraordinary manner. Both will be discussed along with the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. For the routine transition of technology, several tools have been developed that have proven successful in promoting the smooth transition of technology, while simultaneously providing the program executive officers and the science and technology organization leaders information that can assist in the prioritization and resource allocation for science and technology projects. Topics include:

  • Where do you start?
    • How much time do you have until the technology is at TRL 6?
    • How to assess the TRL accurately (TRL calculator)
  • We are short on time - where are the resources
    • JCTDs, TTI, Title III and other sources of help
  • We planned ahead and want a smooth transition
Tools that can facilitate a smooth transition (and have worked elsewhere)
  • Technology Assessment and Transition Management (TATM)
  • Technology Program Management Model (TPMM)
  • T2 (Technology Transition)
  • Other tools

Intended Audience: Program managers, industry and government leaders, scientists and engineers committed to having our Warfighters benefit from DE technology.

Instructor Biography: Mr. Decker is currently the Director, Technology Transition Learning Center of Excellence, Defense Acquisition University and concurrently is a Professor of Engineering Management. His experience includes over 35 years in electro-optics with ten years experience in high energy laser systems, including THEL, ABL, ATL, HELLADS and HELTD, all while employed by Brashear (a division of L-3 Communications) in Pittsburgh, PA. Mr. Decker holds a MS in Physics from the Naval Postgraduate School and a BS in Engineering from Cornell University. He currently consults for Heraeus Quartzglass America in addition to his DAU efforts.


Course 8.  Wargaming

Classification: Unclassified, Limited Distribution D

Instructor:

Day/Time: Half-day course, runs 1300-1700

CEUs awarded: 0.35

Course Description: The first part of the Wargaming course will describe the types and applications of contemporary wargames, provide a history of wargaming, and propose principles on the capabilities and limitations of wargaming based on the evidence provided by that history. The second part of the course presents an overview of the process used by AFRL to organize, develop, and execute an experimentation wargame for innovative and futuristic concepts. The course will also discuss issues being addressed and discovered via experience with wargaming future concepts. The intent of the course is to give a historical distributed mission operations (DMO) perspective and an up-to-date summary of the current experimentation wargaming process and what changes may be needed to continue experimentation wargaming within the Air Force. Topics include:

  • Distributed Mission Operations (DMO) wargaming
  • Adaptation of DMO to "experimentation" wargaming
  • Issues affecting innovative or futuristic concept wargaming

Intended Audience: The course is for junior and senior technical engineers and managers who seek an understanding of DMO experimentation wargaming and its application to support weapon system concept transition to the warfighter.

Instructor Biography:


Course Fees

 

  Single Half-Day Two Half-Day
   Full-time students $0 $0
   Others $250 $450

Registration

To register for a short course separate from the 2017 Systems Symposium, select one of the following options. If you plan to also register for the Systems Symposium, you may use the Systems Symposium registration form instead.

  • Complete this form to register on-line. Note that on-line registration does not require on-line payment.

    Some organizations have installed web filters that prevent on-line registration from inside their facilities. If this appears to be true for you, please try again off-site or use the registration option below.

  • Print this registration form (in PDF format) and follow the instructions provided.

Persons requesting cancellation through 28 August will receive a full refund. Cancellations after 28 August are subject to a $100 cancellation fee. There will be no refunds after 22 September.


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Last updated: 22 July 2017