DIRECTED ENERGY PROFESSIONAL SOCIETY


Annual Directed Energy Science and Technology Symposium
26 February - 2 March 2018 Oxnard, California





 

Overview

Agenda

Short Courses

Symposium Contacts



Attendee Info

Location & Hotel

Local Weather

Registration & Fees

Security

Companions

Tour



Presenter Info

Call for Papers

Submissions

Release Forms



Exhibitor Info

Exhibits

Catered Event

Hospitality Suites

 

Short Courses

The short courses listed below are being offered on Monday, 26 February. Continuing Education Unit (CEU) credits are awarded by DEPS for completion of the short courses.

Registration for the short courses requires payment of a fee. See Course Registration & Fees at the end of this page. Registration for a short course does not require registration for the Symposium.

Not all courses are open to all registrants. All of the classes are unclassified, but some have additional participation requirements, which are listed below and are identified in the Classification field in the course descriptions. See also the Security section, available here.

  • Distribution limitation A - Any registrant may participant.
  • Distribution limitation C - Restricted to U.S. citizens who are employees of the federal government or its contractors.
  • Distribution limitation D - Restricted to U.S. citizens who are employees of the Department of Defense or its contractors.


    Morning Courses

  1. Introduction to HEL Systems (Dist A)

  2. Introduction to HPM Systems (Dist C)

  3. Phased Array HEL Systems
    CANCELLED
    Full Day Courses

  1. Introduction to Beam Control (Dist A)

  2. Introduction to Tri-Service Lethality Science (Dist C)

  3. Beam Directors 101
    (Dist D)
    Afternoon Courses

  1. Atmospheric Laser Propagation (Dist C)

  2. Thermal Management Technologies (Dist D)

  3. HPM Modeling and Effects (Dist C)

  4. Beam Control Tech Assessment Report (Dist D)


Course 1.  Introduction to High Energy Laser Systems

Classification: Distribution limitation A

Instructor: Matthew Leigh, DE JTO

Duration: Half-day course, 0800 to 1200

CEUs awarded: 0.35

Course Description:This lecture will introduce the field of HEL weapons and their associated technologies using an interweaving of technical requirements, history, and accomplishments. The basic attributes of HEL weapons will be covered, leading into discussions of laser-material interaction, lethality, potential weapon applications, system requirements, laser power scaling, propagation, and beam control. DoD interest in tactical applications, current technical issues, and areas of research emphasis will be highlighted.

Intended Audience: This course is geared to those with a technical background who seek an overview of HEL technology and the current state of the art. Individuals who are beginning to work in the field or technical managers who wish an integrated overview would benefit from the class.

Instructor Biography:


Course 2.  Introduction to High Power Microwave Systems

Classification: Distribution limitation C

Instructor:
    -  Samuel Gutierrez, AFRL
    -  Sterling Beeson, AFRL

Duration: Half-day course, 0800-1200

CEUs awarded: 0.35

Course Description: This course will provide an introduction to RF Directed Energy weapons, also known as High Power Microwave (HPM) weapons. The course consists of five parts: 1) a general introduction to the basic terms and concepts, 2) prime power and pulsed power systems needed to drive HPM devices, 3) HPM sources to include concepts and examples, 4) HPM narrowband and wideband antennas, and 5) design and fabrication of HPM systems.

At the end of the class, students will know what RF-DEWs are and how they differ from classical Electronic Warfare and nuclear EMP. Students will learn the various ways to design and develop HPM subsystems to include the fundamental concepts through the practical construction of such systems (science and engineering). Technology discussions will show the difference between narrow band (NB) and ultra-wide band (UWB) sources, antennas and diagnostics, as well as the principal elements of the power systems needed to support them. The course concludes with a examples of HPM systems developed in the recent years.

Topics to be covered include:

  • Definitions, motivation, notional concepts
  • Technology - Power Sources and Power Conditioning, Microwave Oscillators, Antennas, Diagnostics
  • System level design for multiple application

Intended Audience: Newcomers to the field of RF-DEW or managers with some background in science and engineering will benefit the most from this course.

Instructor Biographies:

Sam Gutierrez has over 30 years of experience in directing and performing RDT&E programs. He has worked extensively in Simulation, Effects, Test, and Prototyping of both HPM and High Energy Laser systems. He has had assignments in HPM, Optics, HPC, Test, and as Staff Specialist for DEW at the ASD/R&E. He is currently a Principal Engineer and Program Manager in the AFRL/RD HPM division. He holds an MSEE from the New Mexico State University, a BSEE from the University of New Mexico, DAU level 3 Ratings in SE and S&T management, and FAA Pilot ratings in airplane and rotary wing aircraft.

Sterling Beeson is currently a Research Electronics Engineer at the Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, USA. He works in the Directed Energy Directorate under the High Power Electromagnetic Division where he conducts research on HPEM sources and systems. He received a BS in Applied Physics from Angelo State University and a PhD in Electrical Engineering from Texas Tech University for his work on pulsed RF generated plasmas with an emphasis on pulsed power, low temperature plasma physics, and microwave engineering.


Course 3.  Phased Array HEL Systems CANCELLED

Classification: This course has been cancelled.

Instructor: Mikhail Vorontsov, University of Dayton

Duration: Half-day course, 0800-1200

CEUs awarded: 0.35

Course Description: This class will include an overview of existing beam control technologies and will look at beam control systems envisioned for the future. The class starts with the development of performance equations of a propagated laser beam and shows how disturbances, like jitter, degrade performance. Supporting technologies that include random data processing techniques and control system design will be reviewed prior to discussing beam control designs. Pointing and tracking beam control components and systems will be discussed. The topics of gimbal systems and alignment systems will be described and math models developed. Controls modeling for adaptive optics will be presented. The concepts for future fiber laser beam control systems will be introduced.

Topics include:

  • System performance equations
  • Use of random data to characterize a control system
  • Classical design of a control loop
  • Small angle jitter control
  • Large angle pointing control, gimbals
  • Tracking algorithms
  • Adaptive optics controls modeling and introduction to fiber systems
  • Analysis of a complete beam control system

Intended Audience: The class assumes the students have an engineering background and understand the use differential equations. The class is aimed at persons who will be analyzing beam control system performance, but also should be of use to managers who desire to understand the techniques available for analysis of beam control systems. The class will cover the necessary introductory material, but will progress through this material at a fast pace.

Instructor Biography:


Course 4.  Introduction to Beam Control

Classification: Distribution limitation A

Instructor:
    -  Paul Merritt, Consultant
    -  Mark Spencer, AFRL

Duration: Full-day course, 0800-1700

CEUs awarded: 0.7

Course Description: This class will include an overview of existing beam control technologies and will look at beam control systems envisioned for the future, both hardware and analytical tools. The class starts with the development of performance equations of a propagated laser beam and shows how disturbances, like jitter, degrade performance. Supporting technologies that include random data processing techniques and control system basics will be reviewed prior to discussing beam control designs. The development of estimation techniques will include Least Squares and Kalman filters. Pointing and tracking beam control components and systems will be discussed. The topics of gimbal systems and alignment systems will be described and math models developed. Controls modeling for adaptive optics will be presented. The second edition of the book, Beam Control for Laser Systems will be provided for all students. This book will serve as a reference for the discussed topics. The students should obtain a basic understanding of the primary beam control topics, and should be familiar with the supplied book so they can later study the topics in more detail

Topics to be covered include:

  • System performance equations
  • Aero-optical analysis
  • Use of random data to characterize a control system
  • Classical and modern designs of a control loop
  • Least squares technique
  • Kalman filter basics
  • Small angle jitter control
  • Large angle pointing control, gimbals
  • Tracking algorithms
  • Adaptive optics controls modeling

Intended Audience: The class assumes the students have an engineering background and understand the use differential equations. The class is aimed at persons who will be analyzing beam control system performance, but also should be of use to managers who desire to understand the techniques available for analysis of beam control systems. The class will cover the necessary introductory material, but will progress through this material at a fast pace.

Instructor Biographies:

Dr. Paul Merritt worked in an inertial guidance laboratory at Holloman AFB for 8 years after a tour in the Air Force. He obtained his PhD from UNM in 1974 and started working at Kirtland AFB on beam control for the Airborne Laser Laboratory. He worked on several beam control systems including the ABL. After retiring from the Civil Service he worked for the Boeing Aircraft Co. for 6 years and then taught controls classes at UNM for 7 years. He has taught beam control classes for DEPS for many years.

Mark F. Spencer is a Research Physicist at the Air Force Research Laboratory, Directed Energy Directorate. He is also an Adjunct Assistant professor of Optical Sciences and Engineering (OSE) at the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT), Department of Engineering Physics. Mark received his BS in physics from the University of Redlands in 2008 and his MS nd PhD in OSE from AFIT in 2011 and 2014, respectively. In addition to being a Senior Member of SPIE, he is a Regular Member of the Directed Energy Professional Society and the Optical Society of America.


Course 5.  Introduction to Tri-Service Lethality Science

Classification: Distribution limitation C

Instructor:
    -  Robert Ulibarri, AFRL
    -  Darren Luke, AFRL

Day/Time: All day course, 0800-1700

CEUs awarded: 0.7

Course Description: The short course consists of two distinct sessions as described below.

The Lethality Testing/Equipment Session will provide a discussion of all elements of HEL Lethality testing. The course will address data collection standards to be applied during the planning and execution of the test to assure meaningful and accurate data is collected. It will describe techniques for measuring laser parameters such as power and beam profile during the execution of the test. Experimental test setup and processes will be described along with data acquisition requirements for targets, facility and test conditions as well as the instrumentation and equipment necessary to acquire those measurements. The testing session will conclude with a discussion of testing strategy for successful conducting remote testing. This will include development of test matrices to describe all the key test parameters as well as techniques and methods to execute HEL Lethality full scale target testing.

The Modeling & Simulation Session will describe the key physics associated with laser-material interaction modeling as it applies to laser lethality. The fundamental equations, boundary conditions, input data, analytical and numerical modeling approaches will be reviewed. A summary will be provided of various models, codes and tools used to analyze and predict target effects during HEL engagement. In addition, an overview of the target vulnerability assessment process will be provided in the context of generating target effects data for mission level simulations.

Intended Audience: Students attending this course should have an undergraduate degree in science or engineering. The course is tailored for the system program manager, system designer, and the lethality analyst who are interested in learning the full gamut of HEL lethality and target vulnerability analysis and testing. Experience in the field would be helpful but not necessary.

Instructor Biography:


Course 6.  Beam Directors 101

Classification: Distribution limitation D

Instructor: Bill Decker, DE Consultant

Day/Time: All day course, 0800-1700

CEUs awarded: 0.7

Course Description: The course will cover beam directors from the requirements and parameter that determine the overall approach to the development of a strategy to acquire and integrate a beam director into an HEL system. Subjects include:

  • Performance requirements that drive the design.
  • Laser parameters and how they affect the beam director.
  • Optical design issues, including aperture, F/#, optical materials and HEL coatings.
  • Mechanical design issues, including on-axis and off-axis designs, materials.
  • Beam director design basics, including gimbal performance requirements, jitter and tracking rates.
  • Other considerations, including stray light, off-axis sensors, control systems.
  • Beam director systems engineering - balancing performance with cost, schedule and risk.
  • How to get the best beam director for your budget.

Intended Audience: Program managers, lead engineers, systems engineers of HEL systems that will include a beam director. A technical background is useful, but not required.

Instructor Biography: Bill Deckerís 45 year career includes active duty, industry, university and now DAU experience. He received a BS in Engineering from Cornell University and a MS in Physics from the Naval Postgraduate School. After retirement from the Army, he spent three years with ITT Night Vision as the Manager of Advanced Technology Programs; two years as a program manager with the University of Texas Applied Research Laboratory; and eleven years with Brashear, a Division of L-3 Communications where he was a program manager, product line manager and business developer. At DAU, Bill Decker taught courses in Systems Engineering Management, Information Systems Management and Science & Technology Management. Additionally, he has been invited to lead seminars and give numerous lectures on intellectual property/data rights and open systems architecture. Bill is an active member of the Directed Energy Professional Society(DEPS), where he was a member of the Board of Directors for six years, and Secretary of the Board for two years. Bill has presented numerous short courses at DEPS meetings on Technology Transition, Systems Engineering, IP/Data Rights, High Energy Laser Beam Directors and Optical Materials and Coatings for DE applications.


Course 7.  Atmospheric Laser Propagation

Classification: Distribution limitation C

Instructor:
    -  Steven Fiorino, AFIT
    -  Jaclyn Schmidt, AFIT

Duration: Half-day course, 1300-1700

CEUs awarded: 0.35

Course Description: This course addresses how to characterize and quantify the major effects of the atmosphere on directed energy weapons propagation. A first principles atmospheric propagation and characterization code called the Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) is described and demonstrated. LEEDR enables the creation of climatologically- or numerical weather prediction (NWP)-derived vertical profiles of temperature, pressure, water vapor content, optical turbulence, and atmospheric particulates and hydrometeors as they relate to line-by-line or band-averaged layer extinction coefficient magnitude at any wavelength from 200 nm to 8.6 m. Applying those atmospheric effects to High Energy Lasers (HELs) is addresses by introducing and demonstrating a high-fidelity scaling-law HEL propagation coded called the High Energy Laser End-to-End Operational Simulation HELEEOS.

The course outline is as follows:

  • Intro to atmospheric structure and constituents
    • Atmospheric boundary layer
    • Aerosol / fog / clouds
  • Atmospheric radiative / propagation effects
    • Extinction, refraction
    • Optical turbulence, scintillation
    • Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR)
  • HEL thermal blooming effects in the atmosphere
  • Optics, beam control: turbulence / thermal blooming compensation
  • Coherent beam combining
  • High Energy Laser End to End Operational Simulation (HELEEOS)

Intended Audience: US Government personnel and their direct contractors who have program requirements for or are interested in methods and tools to assess realistic environments and environmental effects for HEL modeling and simulation, HEL mission planning, and/or military systems operations. The course assumes the students have some technical background in radiative transfer through the atmosphere--either via an undergraduate degree or career experience.

Instructor Biography:


Course 8.  Thermal Management Technologies

Classification: Distribution limitation D

Instructor: John Vetrovec, Aqwest

Day/Time: Half-day course, runs 1300-1700

CEUs awarded: 0.35

Course Description: This course offers an overview of current major challenges in thermal management of lasers/electro-optical components/systems and it describes prospective solutions. Students will learn how to approach thermal management from the system engineering point-of-view, become familiar with prospective solutions, and will be introduced to techniques for conducting trade analyses. Significant portion of the course will be devoted to enduring challenges in thermal management, namely handling of high-heat flux loads, dealing with high-power momentary loads, cryogenic cooling, and thermal management on military land/air vehicles. Numerous examples from specific projects and lessons learned will be described. Methodologies, solution toolbox, and extensive references to in-depth information will be provided in printed course material.

Topics include:

  • Requirements for thermal management lasers/electro-optics on military platforms
  • Thermal management principles
  • Applicable thermal management technologies and their limitations
  • Exemplary cases (requirements, what was done, what did / did not work and why)
  • System engineering approach to thermal management
  • Enduring challenges and paths to solutions
  • Future perspectives

Intended Audience: This course is aimed at systems engineers, project engineers/managers/planners, and electro-optical engineers /scientists, but thermal management experts will also benefit from attending. Undergraduate education in science and engineering is beneficial.

Instructor Biography:


Course 9.  HPM Modeling and Effects

Classification: Distribution limitation C

Instructor:
    -  John Tatum, SURVICE
    -  Peter Mardahl, AFRL

Day/Time: Half-day course, runs 1300-1700

CEUs awarded: 0.35

Course Description: This course is an introductory course to High Power Radio Frequency/Microwave (HPM) Directed Energy Weapons (DEW) and their effects. The course will cover what HPM weapons are, the type of weapons Ė Narrowband and Wideband, how the weapons are like, but different from traditional Electronic Warfare (EW) and Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP), how the HPM energy couples in to a targetís electronics and their effects. The course will also cover some of the basic modeling and simulation tools for computing estimating the probability of target failure as a function of weapon power density and range. Finally, we will show an example of how to determine hardening requirements for a notional helicopter against an HPM weapon.

Some topics include:

  • -ICEPIC capabilities and features (at a high level with theory/algorithm instruction as necessary)
  • how to build an HPM source (nuts and bolts of putting an input file together)
  • pitfalls
  • newest capabilities

    Intended Audience: This course is intended for those individuals that are looking for an introduction to High Power Microwave Directed Energy Weapons and their effects on target systems. The course assumes that the student has some science/engineering background and understands Radio Frequency/microwave theory and techniques.

    Instructor Biographies:

    John T. Tatum is an electronic systems engineer working for the SURVICE Engineering Company as a Subject Matter Expert (SME) in the areas of Electronic Warfare (EW) and Radio Frequency Directed Energy Weapons (RF DEWs). He also acts as a SME for the Defense Systems Information Analysis Center (DSIAC) and provides information on RF DEW technology and effects. Before SURVICE he worked 36+ years at the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) in Adelphi, Md. {formerly Harry Diamond Laboratories (HDL)} in ARLís RF Electronics Division where he directed and participates in High Power RF/Microwave (HPM) effects investigations on military systems and supporting infrastructure. Mr. Tatum also investigated the feasibility and effectiveness of RF DEW for Army applications. Mr. Tatum was the Army chairman of the RF DE JMEM Working Group and chaired RF Effects Panel for the OSD Technology Panel on DEW. He is a fellow of the Directed Energy Professional Society (DEPS) and has published several papers on RF susceptibility assessments, system effects investigations and effects data bases in both DoD and IEEE conferences.

    Peter J. Mardahl holds two B.S. degrees from University of California, Berkeley, in Electrical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering, awarded 1992. In 2001 he finished his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering at Berkeley, and in 2002 joined the Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, NM. His research has included simulated laser-plasma interactions, high power magnetron design, and PIC code development. He is now working as a computational physicist designing high power microwave devices.


    Course 10.  Beam Control Technology Assessment Report

    Classification: Distribution limitation D

    Instructor:
        -  Paul Berger, MIT Lincoln Laboratory
        -  Keith Bush, Belcan
        -  Amanda Clark, SMDC
        -  David Loomis, DNL Consulting
        -  Dan Marker, AFRL/RD
        -  Don Wittich, AFRL/RD

    Day/Time: Half-day course, runs 1300-1700

    CEUs awarded: 0.35

    Course Description:

    The purpose of the Beam Control Technology Assessment (BCTA) report is to provide an updated assessment of beam control technologies involved in the Servicesí tactical HEL missions and identify a prioritized list of beam control technology advancements that would improve the execution of these missions or enhance these missions. As part of this work, a top-level roadmap was assembled that incorporates the main elements of the Servicesí roadmap. This document also identifies technology efforts funded by the High Energy Laser Joint Technology Office (HEL JTO), now designated the Joint Directed Energy Technology Transition Office (DE JTO) that have potential for transition to military departments and defense agencies.

    This course will describe an assessment of beam control technology conducted under the auspices of Beam Control TAWG for the DE JTO. The objectives of the assessment are to understand the capabilities of current beam control technologies and compare them to the requirements of potential tactical HEL missions, identify any shortfalls, and develop a recommended investment plan for the DE JTO and the Services.

    The course will include the following material:

    1. Outline of the assessment methodology
    2. Potential tactical HEL missions, Servicesí needs and roadmaps
    3. Mission Environments, including atmospheric phenomena and base disturbances
    4. Aero-effects, including platform aero buffeting and tilt and wavefront disturbances on beam propagation.
    5. Target and scene models, wave-optics codes, and scaling law codes used in performance modeling.
    6. Beam Control Technology, including Target Acquisition and Coarse Tracking, HEL Beam Pointing, Precision Tracking, Aimpoint Selection and Maintenance, Wavefront Compensation, and HEL Target Engagement
    7. HEL Phased Array Beam Control Architectures.
    8. Transition of JTO-funded beam control technology to the Services.

    Intended Audience: This course should benefit HEL Weapons System program managers and engineers engaged in designing or analyzing HEL Weapons Systems. A science or engineering degree and some knowledge of tactical missions, beam control technology, and atmospheric propagation will be useful. After attending the course, the student should have a better understanding of the current status of beam control technology, emerging developments in the field, and opportunities to contribute to future technology developments.

    Instructor Biographies:

    Dr. Paul J. Berger is a Senior Staff member at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. He has a background in atmospheric propagation, beam-control technology, and HEL systems analysis. He was the project leader for several beam-control field tests, including the high-power MIRACL local-loop compensation tests and the Atmospheric Compensation Experiments conducted over long paths to sounding rockets. He was the Beam Control lead for the Airborne Laser program from 1992 to 1995. Berger has a B.S. in physics from MIT and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Harvard University.

    Keith A. Bush is a Senior Scientist with Belcan Government Services and supports the DE JTO with Beam Control analysis and technical consulting services. He has a background in modeling, simulation and analysis of lasers, optical imaging systems, atmospheric propagation, adaptive optics, and satellite optical scattering. Bush has a B.S. in Applied Physics from Georgia Tech and has pursued graduate work in optical sciences through the University of New Mexico.

    Mrs. Amanda Clark has supported High Energy Laser research and development for the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command since 2008. She has worked on all aspects of HEL technology from laser spectroscopy research to adaptive optics and tracking field testing. She is currently the technical lead over the HEL division's Advanced Concepts group and is serving as the HEL JTO Beam Control TAWG chair.

    Mr. David N. Loomis is a Senior Scientist / Consultant and supports the DE JTO with Beam Control analysis and technical consulting services. He has a background in program management, system engineering, test and evaluation of Navy Missile Systems and High Energy Lasers. Loomis has a B.A. in Physics from William Jewell College and a Masterís Degree in Systems Management from the University of Southern California.

    Dan Marker has been the portfolio manager for AFRL / RD, Phased Array Program since 2002. Two advancing technologies have evolved from that program; Digital Holography and Tiled arrays.

    Donald (D. J.) Wittich is the principal investigator for Aero-Effects and Beam Control at AFRLís Directed Energy Directorate in New Mexico. Dr. Wittich is an aerospace engineer with over 13 years of experience in aero-effects research for directed energy applications. He earned his Bachelorís degree from the U.S. Air Force Academy and his Masterís and PhD from the University of Notre Dame.


    Course Fees

     

      Single Half-Day Two Half-Day
       Full-time students $0 $0
       Others $250 $450
     
       Note: Two half day classes can be selected for the price of a full-day class.

    Registration

    To register for a short course separate from the Annual DE S&T Symposium, select one of the following options. (If you plan to also register for the Symposium, you may use the Symposium registration form instead.)

    • Complete this form to register on-line. Note that on-line registration does not require on-line payment.

      Some organizations have installed web filters that prevent on-line registration from inside their facilities. If this appears to be true for you, please try again off-site or use the registration option below.

    • Print this registration form (in PDF format) and follow the instructions provided.

    Persons requesting cancellation through 29 January will receive a full refund. Cancellations after 29 January are subject to a $100 cancellation fee. There will be no refunds after 23 February.


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    Last updated: 7 February 2018